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    Our Richmond drug possession defense lawyer provides a more detailed explanation of constructive possession charges in Virginia.

    In Virginia, it is unlawful to knowingly and intentionally possess a controlled substance without the proper authorization (Code of Virginia § 18.2-250). It is important to understand that actual physical possession is not required for a person to be charged with and convicted of a drug crime in the Commonwealth. A defendant may be arrested based on a concept called ‘constructive possession’—meaning if police find drugs in your vehicle, you may still be charged with a crime. Here, our Richmond...

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    Amid Coronavirus Outbreak, Officials Have Created an Anti-Fraud Task Force in Virginia

    Coronavirus (COVID-19) has devastated communities throughout the country and around the world. As of April 14th, the Virginia Department of Health reports that nearly 6,200 COVID-19 cases have been confirmed—with more expected in the coming weeks. The fast spreading virus is a serious public health threat. Officials are also worried that it may lead to an increase in fraud. Recently, the Department of Justice (DOJ) announced the Virginia Coronavirus Anti-Fraud Task Force—a joint state and federal law enforcement operation designed...

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    Probation violation in Virginia

    In Virginia, a defendant may end up on probation if they receive a suspended sentence or after they have been released from incarceration. The Virginia Department of Corrections (VADOC) notes that defendants must strictly comply with the terms of their probation. Failure to do so could lead to very serious consequences. If you violate probation, you must take immediate action to protect your rights. Here, our Richmond probation violation lawyer explains the most important things you need to know if...

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    Grand Larceny

    According to reporting from WHSV-TV, Virginia Governor Ralph Northam has signed House Bill 995 into law. The bill—an important part of the governor’s overall criminal justice reform agenda—will raise the threshold for a felony grand larceny charge from $500 to $1,000. The new law is set to take effect on July 1st, 2020. The reforms will bring Virginia more in line with other states around the country. As noted by The Marshall Project, the Commonwealth has the lowest felony theft...

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    DUI refusal law

    Every driver on the road in Virginia has, by the mere fact of operating a vehicle, already given their consent to provide a breath sample or a blood sample upon being arrested for a DUI. If you are arrested for a DUI and you refuse to do so, your license will be subject to an immediate suspension. We want to make sure that every driver understands their rights and responsibilities. Here, our Richmond drunk driving defense lawyer explains four of...

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    SB 16

    The rise in gun-related deaths has led policymakers, organizers, concerned citizens, and legislators to consider their position on gun ownership and, in some cases, come together to take legislative action. Indeed, that’s exactly what’s happening in Virginia, where SB 16 has been prefiled in preparation for the 2020 legislative session. The bill, officially named, “SB 16 Assault firearms and certain firearm magazines; prohibiting sale, transport, etc., penalties,” is contentious, to say the least. The following provides an overview of SB...

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    2A sanctuary cities

    If you hear the term “sanctuary city” and immediately think of cities where undocumented immigrants can seek a form of refuge, you’d be right; however, the words ‘sanctuary city’ aren’t just being used to talk about immigrants these days. To be sure, a “2A sanctuary city” refers to a safe haven for gun owners - 2A standing for Second Amendment. The American Second Amendment sanctuary movement is very much alive in our country, and Virginia counties and localities are getting...

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    5 Defenses to DUI/DWI Charges in Richmond, Virginia

    Driving while intoxicated (DWI), sometimes known as driving under the influence (or DUI), is a crime that is taken extremely seriously in Virginia. Under Virginia law (Code of Virginia § 18.2-266), it is unlawful to drive a vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 percent or more. It is also unlawful to drive under the influence of alcohol regardless of the BAC, as well as under the influence of any other intoxicating drugs. In other words, a person...

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    dui

    A DUI or DWI is a serious offense under Virginia law (Code of Virginia § 18.2-266) that comes with serious penalties (Code of Virginia § 18.2-270) upon conviction. Given that you could face a substantial penalty, a driver’s license suspension, and jail time, it is important to do everything you can to avoid giving the police evidence to use against you in your case. In other words, you should know what to do if you are stopped on suspicion of...

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    federal crimes

    When a person is charged with a felony criminal offense, it is often clear whether it is a state or a federal offense. For example, on the one hand, if a person violates a state law of Virginia and does so completely within the bounds of the state—such as robbery in a downtown Richmond retail establishment—that crime typically will be charged under Virginia state law. On the other hand, if a person is accused of burglary or robbery inside a...

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